Powerful desktop computer for genomics
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6.2 years ago
Alternative ▴ 270

Dear all,

I would like to purchase a desktop computer to be used by a student to run NGS pipelines for whole genome exome sequencing, RNA-seq, ChIP-seq and other similar applications. No need for Whole Genome Sequencing nor assembly pipelines.

Which desktop computer exists in the market and able to perform such tasks with a bit of parallelization (say 3/4 exome sample at a time)?

I was thinking of a desktop computer with around 12 cores (or higher if existing i.e up to 32 cores) and a minimum of 32 Gb of RAM.

Having a server is an option but I need a faster short term solution,

Any help in this matter (brand, link to a computer with such specs) is appreciated,

Thanks

next-gen sequencing ChIP-Seq RNA-Seq • 4.4k views
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More RAM (64 would be better) with 12 cores would be fine for a workstation. If you are with an organization then look into local contract pricing for vendors (you may save upto 20-25% off published costs). High end workstations should perform equally well no matter which vendor you select (Dell, HP, Lenovo and others).

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Mine is from DELL (I think 7810 series) and has 16 cores (32 threads), 128 GB RAM, 512 GB SSD and a two 2 TB HDDs in RAID 1. You'd be surprised how much memory some applications like clustering of NGS reads takes. No way 32 GB RAM is adequate for NGS stuff..

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We recently purchased a computer from Microway. 128gb RAM, 16 cores, 8 TB storage for 5.5k USD.

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It may help to say what part of the world (continent, if you don't want to be specific) you are from so you can get usable recommendations in terms of vendors.

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Depending on your planned usage, it might be more interesting to consider a cloud-based solution.

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Many thanks all for your replies. Very helpful.

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This might do. Though a server, but pretty powerful, indeed.

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Nah .. that one maxes out at 64G :-)

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And the GPUs are a total waste in the context of bioinformatics..

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Eh, there's some good stuff you can do with GPUs.

(but i agree a MacPro for bioinformatics is not the most cost-effective)

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