Job: Looking for job/internship opportunity
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gravatar for sally009
4 weeks ago by
sally0090
sally0090 wrote:

Hi all,

I have a BSc in biomedical informatics. I cannot find a job as I don't have experience. The majority of the jobs post ask for 2-3 years of experience working in the field? How do I gain experience or how do I even land an internship in the field? I am based in New York. THANK YOU.

ADD COMMENTlink modified 4 weeks ago by dom.byrne1320 • written 4 weeks ago by sally0090
1

Doing a PhD might be an ideal way to get some experience/broaden your skillset?

ADD REPLYlink written 4 weeks ago by dom.byrne1320
2

There is an MS/MSc in between.

ADD REPLYlink written 4 weeks ago by cpad01129.4k

Also possible, often not necessary though in many cases so it ultimately comes down to preference

ADD REPLYlink written 4 weeks ago by dom.byrne1320

I assume you will need a master degree to start a PhD, no?

ADD REPLYlink written 4 weeks ago by lieven.sterck2.6k

I don't know about the US but at least where I'm based many people go straight from a BSc to a PhD in life sciences. I know this isn't true in other disciplines so it might well vary geographically also.

ADD REPLYlink written 4 weeks ago by dom.byrne1320

If you have 4 year's of college then no. In British system (followed in many parts of Asia), a BSc degree is obtained after 3 years of college (after graduation from high school).

ADD REPLYlink modified 4 weeks ago • written 4 weeks ago by genomax57k

ah, OK, the belgian system a MS/Msc is required to be able to start a PhD. And indeed geographical differences there will be.

ADD REPLYlink written 4 weeks ago by lieven.sterck2.6k

I have four year of college

ADD REPLYlink written 4 weeks ago by sally0090

In the UK system its very common to go directly from 3 year Bachelors degree directly to PhD (though its harder and you have to be a more standout candidate).

ADD REPLYlink written 4 weeks ago by jrj.healey7.7k
1
gravatar for genomax
4 weeks ago by
genomax57k
United States
genomax57k wrote:

If you are able to .. offer to start volunteering (if needed) in a local academic institution. Once you prove your worth (it may take 2-4 months of free work) the group may consider hiring you officially or you could use the practical experience to look for other opportunities.

If you need a visa to legally work in the US then all bets may be off.

ADD COMMENTlink written 4 weeks ago by genomax57k
1

You may not necessarily have to work for free. If you got in touch with some academics at NYU for instance, you may be able to get a summer project or similar (they sometimes pay - though rarely well).

ADD REPLYlink written 4 weeks ago by jrj.healey7.7k

I don't have any visa issue. However, I am not able to get any responses after applying for jobs. I guess i should stop it and apply for grad school instead?

ADD REPLYlink written 4 weeks ago by sally0090
1

It will often take time, and the failure rate is likely high anyway. You will need to be persistent - its very competitive out there.

If you are really hitting a brick wall after several weeks or months, you should reflect on your resume quality and your approach. It might be that your resume doesn't stand out visually, and it might be time to have a redesign, or shuffle the information around etc.

Grad school is certainly a viable option, but is not a decision to be taken lightly, especially in the US where it takes even longer.

You might also consider applying for some research positions a little outside of your particular area of interest, and then attempt to move laterally later on, or work in informatics skills in to those jobs. People with informatics skills are often prized more highly by groups that lack those skills, than groups which excel at them (that is to say, maybe work on a wet-lab project, and become to go-to whizz in that group, before climbing the ranks among a 'proper' bioinformatics lab etc.)

ADD REPLYlink written 4 weeks ago by jrj.healey7.7k

Great. Thanks for the response. I have been hearing about the IT consultancy training schools, do you think its a good way to land a job or gain skills ?

ADD REPLYlink written 4 weeks ago by sally0090
3

Not for bioinformatics/informatics. If you are just looking to find a job then yes.

I think @Joe may be on to something in his comment above.

you should reflect on your resume quality and your approach. It might be that your resume doesn't stand out visually, and it might be time to have a redesign, or shuffle the information around etc.

You may want to work with a resume coach/create a LinkedIn profile (spiff it up if you have one) and start doing some networking locally. When you apply for a job never send in a generic resume. Make sure you highlight relevant experience by shuffling things as needed, drop unnecessary information and write a good cover letter, where you can.

ADD REPLYlink modified 4 weeks ago • written 4 weeks ago by genomax57k
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