Question: Did both mitochondrial DNA and the Y chromosome coalesce within the last several hundred thousand years ?
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gravatar for rprog008
10 months ago by
rprog00830
rprog00830 wrote:

Did mitochondrial DNA and the Y chromosome coalesce within the last several hundred thousand years.

I am not understanding how mt and Y chromosome have merged in human. Can anyone please explain me this line ?

I am following this paper. https://www.pnas.org/content/95/4/1961

ADD COMMENTlink written 10 months ago by rprog00830
2

This question may not fit in the topics covered on this forum, because this is a question on evolutionary theory, not bioinformatics.

A relatively simplified analogy of coalescence theory is to think it in the other (reverse) direction: imagine on an isolated island the starting population consists of a fixed number of families. The families pass down the last names strictly through the fathers. Through the generations, last names would be lost for the families without sons. Eventually, there would be only one last name on the island, and this name could be traced back to one of the founding families on the island.

Mt and Y DNAs are passed down through maternal and paternal lines, respectively, like last names. Tracing back the lineages, all existing copies of Mt DNA would coalesce to one ancient copy, likewise for Y chromosomes. It should be noted that the ancient copies of Mt and Y may not co-exist at the same time in the ancient population, and it is definitely impossible to co-exist in one single individual.

ADD REPLYlink modified 10 months ago • written 10 months ago by Vitis2.2k
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