Job:Bioinformatics Research Analyst, Washington University @ St. Louis, Missouri, USA
0
1
Entering edit mode
4.0 years ago
jwelch ▴ 10

The ideal candidate will be responsible for turning genomic data into actionable insights by recognizing trends and anomalies in multivariate datasets.

Responsibilities

  • Conduct fact-based research and analysis using genomic data from clinical trials in AML.

Relevant skills:

  • R-based bioinformatic tools to analyze RNA-Seq and single-cell RNA-Seq, mutation calling using exome sequencing and evaluate subclonal changes at relapse using whole genome sequencing.
  • Assist with publication of research commentaries and papers
  • Evaluate new and established research sources
  • Prepare materials that summarize data and draw conclusions to support key scientific observations

Qualifications

  • Bachelor's or Master's degree or equivalent experience
  • Expertise with R or python
  • Experience with genomic bioinformatic tools

Job posting at https://jobs.wustl.edu, posting #47141. (https://jobs.wustl.edu/psc/APPLHRMS/EMPLOYEE/HRMS/c/HRS_HRAM.HRS_APP_SCHJOB.GBL?Page=HRS_APP_JBPST&REL_ACTION=Yes&SiteId=1&HRS_JO_PST_TYPE=E&HRS_JOB_OPENING_ID=47141&HRS_JO_PST_SEQ=1).

Workplace description

The Welch lab at Washington University is an innovative, collaborative environment that seeks to understand the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia and to develop better algorithms for diagnosis and treatment. On-going studies focus on the use of Next-generation sequencing to understand the biology of AML and responses to chemotherapy. These studies use exome sequencing to quantify responses to decitabine using peripheral blood collections vs. bone marrow collections; use RNA-Seq and scRNA-Seq to understand the transcriptional changes induced in primary bone marrow samples during decitabine treatment; and use whole genome bisulfite sequencing to understand the epigenetic changes induced by decitabine. Parallel projects focus on the function of retinoid receptors in normal and malignant hematopoiesis and when and how nuclear receptors can be therapeutic targets in AML. These apply Cut&Run and BioID to understand the biology of retinoid receptors and their therapeutic potential. Further description of recent and on-going research in the Welch lab can be found here: https://hematology.wustl.edu/people/faculty/Welch/Welch_Res.html.

John Welch: jwelch@wustl.edu

R genome RNA-Seq next-gen • 1.7k views
ADD COMMENT

Login before adding your answer.

Traffic: 3260 users visited in the last hour
Help About
FAQ
Access RSS
API
Stats

Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy.

Powered by the version 2.3.6