Question: Types of base substitutions
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gravatar for banerjeeshayantan
10 weeks ago by
banerjeeshayantan190 wrote:

I was reading this Wikipedia article on Mutational Signatures and I came across this section titled Types of mutations: base substitutions. I don't understand why the C>A mutations are indistinguishable from G>T. When we are cataloging the mutations we do have the strand information, right? Can someone please elaborate?

There are six classes of base substitution: C>A, C>G, C>T, T>A, T>C, T>G. The G>T substitution is considered equivalent to the C>A substitution because it is not possible to differentiate on which DNA strand (forward or reverse) the substitution initially occurred. Both the C>A and G>T substitutions are therefore counted as part of the "C>A" class. For the same reason the G>C, G>A, A>T, A>G and A>C mutations are counted as part of the "C>G", "C>T", "T>A", "T>C" and "T>G" classes respectively.

snp genome • 150 views
ADD COMMENTlink written 10 weeks ago by banerjeeshayantan190

You need read the article again:

it is not possible to differentiate on which DNA strand (forward or reverse) the substitution initially occurred...

So, if there is a C that changed to A, what is there on the opposite strand, before and after?

Also, not really bioinformatics. Hope this helps your understanding anyway.

ADD REPLYlink written 10 weeks ago by Michael Dondrup48k
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