Question: Bioinformatician'S Guide To Concepts In Biology
6
gravatar for Arun
8.1 years ago by
Arun2.3k
Germany
Arun2.3k wrote:

Hello, I have been a hardcore bioinformatician, dedicating little towards "Biology" during my courses or Masters. However, I decided to be more balanced, started my Phd, and am loving it. I am so much interested in the actual biology rather than working most of the time with data analysis without REALLY knowing what its all about. I mean, the complete picture. Not that, I don't love data analysis, neither do I bear anything against those who are hardcore data analysts.

But now that my interests are shifted, I would like to understand more of it. I am looking for a book that complements equally the biology with the bioinformatics. For example, if you take QTLs or GWAS, I would like to know the "Biology" behind it, and then how the bioinformatic techniques have evolved to help infer from them. I don't mind if I am exposed entirely to the biological concepts first and then the bioinformatics behind it or as another book. I just would like to understand the complete picture. Any suggestions?

Thank you very much! Arun.

books education • 2.2k views
ADD COMMENTlink modified 7.8 years ago by David Quigley11k • written 8.1 years ago by Arun2.3k
3

I think the answers from this BioStar question could be a good start: http://biostar.stackexchange.com/questions/3073/best-resources-to-learn-molecular-biology-for-a-computer-scientist

ADD REPLYlink written 8.1 years ago by Chris Evelo10.0k

Awesome! I'll get started right away.

ADD REPLYlink written 8.1 years ago by Arun2.3k
2
gravatar for David Quigley
8.1 years ago by
David Quigley11k
San Francisco
David Quigley11k wrote:

You cannot go wrong with a copy of Molecular Biology of the Cell (Alberts et al). This is the standard undergraduate text in molecular biology and it's really good. The previous edition is available for free in broken up into pieces at the NCBI, but it's much nicer to own the full massive textbook. As a bioinformatics professor once told me, "there should be one in every home."

ADD COMMENTlink written 8.1 years ago by David Quigley11k

Absolutely! It's astounding how accessible this text is. And it's so well-written that it can function as more than a reference.

ADD REPLYlink written 8.1 years ago by Vince Buffalo460
1
gravatar for Julien
8.1 years ago by
Julien150
Julien150 wrote:

Take a look at Introduction to Quantitative Genetics by Falconer & Mackay (http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Quantitative-Genetics-Douglas-Falconer/dp/0582243025/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1304605009&sr=1-1), probably available at your university library.

ADD COMMENTlink written 8.1 years ago by Julien150
1
gravatar for Swbarnes2
8.1 years ago by
Swbarnes21.5k
Swbarnes21.5k wrote:

I think the biology is going to depend on the project. Someone can use GWAS or QTLs to study...drug metabolism or Parkison's, or eye color, if they really wanted to. Maybe you should talk to the wet bench biologist you are working with, and have them explain some of the biology behind their field, and how those kinds of studies contribute to that. Or try to read the papers of one of your wet-bench collaborators.

ADD COMMENTlink written 8.1 years ago by Swbarnes21.5k
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