Question: Snp, Dip, Snv Notation
4
gravatar for 2184687-1231-83-
7.0 years ago by
2184687-1231-83-4.9k wrote:

A nomenclature question. Considering:

  • a SNP is a single nucleotide polymorphism, so a nucleotide change within-species of a single position, and
  • a DIP is a deletion/insertion polymorphism, so an indel within-species of a single genomic position,
    how would one call:

  • a nucleotide change between-species of a single homologous genomic coordinate?

  • how about an indel between-species of a single homologous genomic coordinate? Is there an official or recognized nomenclature for them?

snp • 21k views
ADD COMMENTlink modified 3.5 years ago by scott.a.fay0 • written 7.0 years ago by 2184687-1231-83-4.9k
2

do you have a reference to that definition of SNV?

ADD REPLYlink written 7.0 years ago by Jeremy Leipzig17k
1

I thought the difference between SNP and SNV was one of population frequency (SNP being a frequently observed SNV) not of intra versus inter species differences

ADD REPLYlink written 7.0 years ago by Russh1.2k
11
gravatar for Boboppie
7.0 years ago by
Boboppie520
Cambridge, UK
Boboppie520 wrote:

It might clarify the SNP and SNV by reading this blog - "SNP vs. SNP"?

Quote:

SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) vs. SNV (single nucleotide variant) As their name suggests, both are concerned with aberrations at a single nucleotide. However, a SNP is when an aberration is expected at the position for any member in the species – for example, a well characterized allele. A SNV on the other hand is when there is a variation at a position that hasn’t been well characterized – for example, when it is only seen in one individual. It is really all a question of frequency of occurrence.

ADD COMMENTlink modified 7.0 years ago • written 7.0 years ago by Boboppie520

I changed my question accordingly

ADD REPLYlink written 7.0 years ago by 2184687-1231-83-4.9k
0
gravatar for scott.a.fay
3.5 years ago by
scott.a.fay0 wrote:

Single-nucleotide and indel/delins changes between species are phylogenetic characters; they can be either informative or uninformative depending on the taxa being considered.

http://biomed.brown.edu/Courses/BIO48/26.Systematics.HTML

ADD COMMENTlink written 3.5 years ago by scott.a.fay0
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