RNA without replication
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3 months ago

I did 3 different methods for analyzing a research project. Two methods out f 3, were replicated. The 3rd method is RNA Seq analyzing. It has not been replicated. May I know if this research can be published in a good journal? If yes, kindly introduce some of them.

Thanks,

analysis RNA Seq • 704 views
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It is impossible for us to say if your particular piece of research can be published because there is much more to it than the issue of replication. To be published in high-impact journals, you need to bring (1) novel and interesting findings that are (2) well supported by data. The confidence you can have in unreplicated RNA-seq data is weak, so it cannot be used to make strong claims (such as "RNA-seq data shows that gene X is downregulated in condition Y") but it can be used to back up other converging evidences, or for visualization (metagenes, genome browser snapshot, ...) From the back of my head, I remember at least two studies with unreplicated RNA-seq in it that made it in top tier journals because the story was interesting and because they did not based their conclusion on RNA-seq alone (10.1016/j.celrep.2019.05.107, 10.1038/nsmb.2893) .

It is also impossible for us to provide advice on appropriate journals for your study without reading it. I suggest that you take your manuscript to a local mentor that might be able to give you better feedback.

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Carlo Thanks for your comment

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You will not be able to publish a non-replicated bulk RNA-seq study in a "good" journal. By 'good', let's assume that we mean any with Impact Factor > 10. By 'replicated', let's assume that we mean biological replicates.

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thanks, Kevin, Yes, I did biological replicates for the other two methods and RNA extraction. How about a lower impact factor?<10?

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Are you re-processing data from studies already published? In this case, I think that you should plan for a journal of Impact Factor ~1 - sorry.

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No, this part is novel in the research. Nobody did it. The novelty is comparison gene expression on specific cells.

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If it's all novel, then you may get a very focussed journal (focussed on your disease area) that has Impact Factor ~4 or a bit higher. Or, if you are at one of the leading institutes and know an editor, you may get a higher journal. As per seidel, though, I guess that you or your supervisor should know the journal 'landscape' already. Please just don't go for one of the scam journals.

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I'm a little curious to know how you're not yourself familiar with an appropriate journal. Usually to publish in a field, one has to read extensively in that field, thus developing a sense for what kinds of studies different journals accommodate. I would try taking various background articles you read for your work, and giving them your own ranking, and see where you think your work fits.

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