Question: (Closed) Stop Codons In Coding Sequences Of Human
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gravatar for ayamitjyoti12
5.7 years ago by
ayamitjyoti120 wrote:

Hi,

I have studied that the transcription starts at the START CODON and continues till a STOP CODON is encountered.

To verify it,i downloaded the coding sequences of gene ENSG00000160216 from the ensemble site. And found many STOP CODONs in the sequence. I am not able to comprehend how the stop codons are present in the coding sequence.

codon • 2.1k views
ADD COMMENTlink modified 5.7 years ago by cnluzon30 • written 5.7 years ago by ayamitjyoti120

"I have studied that the transcription starts at the START CODON and continues till a STOP CODON is encountered." Then you have studied from the wrong sources, where did you find this "information"? Closing for not a real question, not bioinformatics.

  • hint 1: it is TRANSLATION not transcription
  • hint 2: Stop codons are not part of the coding sequence, why, because they don't code for anything.
  • hint 3: not every triplet in a sequence is a codon, that doesn't contradict 2
ADD REPLYlink modified 5.7 years ago • written 5.7 years ago by Dr. Mabuse47k
0
gravatar for Nicolas Rosewick
5.7 years ago by
Belgium, Brussels
Nicolas Rosewick8.5k wrote:

Actually translation, not transcription, star at the Start codon and stops at a Stop codon. And they are three possible lecture frames ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reading_frame ) so it's possible that you find multiple stop codon but it might that they are derived from different lecture frames.

ADD COMMENTlink modified 5.7 years ago • written 5.7 years ago by Nicolas Rosewick8.5k
0
gravatar for cnluzon
5.7 years ago by
cnluzon30
Spain
cnluzon30 wrote:

although stop codons represent the end of translation, it is totally possible and correct that you might find several stop codons, since it also depends on the ORF (Open Reading Frame) (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_reading_frame).

This basically means that you have to take codons three by three, so there are six ways of grouping codons for each sequence (three for one strand, three for the complementary strand). If you are programatically looking at this, you should take into accout this when scanning through the sequence, otherwise you might find stop codons that do not really stop the process.

You can take a look also at this website: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/gorf/gorf.html which shows you the open reading frames for any sequence you search.

ADD COMMENTlink modified 5.7 years ago • written 5.7 years ago by cnluzon30
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