Question: (Closed) HELP!! Enzyme in Laundry Detergent
2
gravatar for jellymami
4 weeks ago by
jellymami20
jellymami20 wrote:

Hello everyone,

I’m a mum of a biology student in high school and would like to help her with her assignment or at least how to help her go about starting the assignment.

She’s supposed to ​determine the effect of ​concentration​ on enzyme activity in laundry detergent via a made up experiment.

Which laundry detergent have or doesn’t have enzymes? Why certain stains? Why certain fabrics?

Any help would be greatly appreciated

enzymes • 132 views
ADD COMMENTlink modified 4 weeks ago by Kevin Blighe41k • written 4 weeks ago by jellymami20
1

Hello jellymami!

We believe that this post does not fit the main topic of this site.

Completely off-topic.

For this reason we have closed your question. This allows us to keep the site focused on the topics that the community can help with.

If you disagree please tell us why in a reply below, we'll be happy to talk about it.

Cheers!

ADD REPLYlink written 4 weeks ago by ATpoint15k
2
gravatar for Kevin Blighe
4 weeks ago by
Kevin Blighe41k
London, England
Kevin Blighe41k wrote:

Hello, I happen to enjoy washing clothes. Generally, detergents that are labeled as 'non-bio' will not contain an enzyme.

Some pointers:

  • do not mix whites with your colours
  • wash new jeans on their own for a while, as they will likely bleach dye / colour
  • for heavily-soiled clothing, think about adding more detergent and choosing the correct temperature. A longer wash may be needed, too.

In any case, I have indirectly given my answer already. The enzymatic activity for cleaning the crap off the clothes will be determined by:

  • enzyme (detergent) and substrate (crap on clothes) concentrations
  • temperature of the solvent (i.e. the water from your mains) in which the enzyme is dissolved. Different enzymes will function better at different temperatures. Recently, enzymes have been used that can peak at lower temperatures, like 30 Celsius / 85 Fahrenheit.
  • time - filthy clothes may simply require a bit longer to be cleaned

One of the most commonly-known models of enzyme kinetics is known as the 'Michaelis-Menton'. I suggest that your daughter research that.

Kevin

ADD COMMENTlink modified 4 weeks ago • written 4 weeks ago by Kevin Blighe41k
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