Question: Will Doing A Masters In Bioinformatics Restrict My Career As A Biological Programmer
4
gravatar for m87
6.4 years ago by
m8740
m8740 wrote:

Hi, i have completed my undergrad as a CSE major. I'm very interested to do a masters in Bioinformatics. But by doing so, am I limiting my career path only to biological programmer. If not, what are the areas that bioinformatics can take me to? Thanks.

bioinformatics • 2.3k views
ADD COMMENTlink modified 6.4 years ago by k.nirmalraman980 • written 6.4 years ago by m8740
3

Bioinformatics can also be about data analysis. As the field is huge, only an aspect of this may be taught in an MSc. However the real question you should be asking is why you want to take the course. What interests you? You should be wanting to restrict yourself (i.e. have a focus) because you love the subject area. Search for inspiration ( other threads here, blogs, papers etc) and for a feel of what is happening in the field.

ADD REPLYlink modified 6.4 years ago • written 6.4 years ago by Alastair Kerr5.2k
5
gravatar for Pawel Szczesny
6.4 years ago by
Pawel Szczesny3.2k
Poland
Pawel Szczesny3.2k wrote:

There's a distinction on the job market between researcher and programmer. The question is, which one of these you plan to be? The job market for talented programmers is growing (and I'm buying Rao's arguments on developeronomics), although I don't think there's a significantly large market for talented researchers.

More seriously: courses don't limit career options. Lack of talent or social skills do. Bioinformatics from programmers point of view is a field as many others - cool stuff is cutting edge stuff (think big data, network analysis, stochastic modelling and similar). One of my colleagues (bioinformatician) moved to investment fund just after his first postdoc - he was hired for his programming skills in developing computational models.

And finally, have you asked te same question on other forums, preferably more general than this one? Consensus methods are bioinformatics' bread and butter ;).

ADD COMMENTlink written 6.4 years ago by Pawel Szczesny3.2k
1
gravatar for Damian Kao
6.4 years ago by
Damian Kao15k
USA
Damian Kao15k wrote:

I think you'll find that the skills you gain from analyzing biological data sets, especially NGS data to be very translational. It is very common for me to find resources related to economic modeling, sociological data, benchmarking networks..etc when searching for information on an analytical method. At the end of the day, we all become data scientists.

ADD COMMENTlink modified 6.4 years ago • written 6.4 years ago by Damian Kao15k
0
gravatar for Dan Gaston
6.4 years ago by
Dan Gaston7.1k
Canada
Dan Gaston7.1k wrote:

It all really depends on what you end up doing as a Master's project to be honest. I would hazard that most bioinformaticians tend to come from a background in life sciences instead of computer science, so our career paths may not be as applicable.

ADD COMMENTlink written 6.4 years ago by Dan Gaston7.1k

Funny -- I would have hazarded the opposite guess :-)

ADD REPLYlink written 6.4 years ago by Steve Lianoglou5.0k

Depends on your definition I suppose on the split between computational biologist and bioinformatician. But demographics are shifting as well, at least in my experience I know very few who are computer scientists.

ADD REPLYlink written 6.4 years ago by Dan Gaston7.1k

Likewise, and on my masters course there were 2 computer scientists, a statistician, an engineer and around 17 biologists

ADD REPLYlink written 6.4 years ago by Ben2.0k

I find that more computational biologists come from a cs background while more bioinformaticians come from a biostats/life sciences background

ADD REPLYlink written 6.4 years ago by Ying W3.9k

I have observe the inverse in the 3 institutes where I have been

ADD REPLYlink written 6.4 years ago by JC7.7k

Different people use the terms Bioinformatician and Computational Biologist in different ways. Some use Bioinformatics to refer to the more CS-side and Comp. Biol. for the Biology side, others the reverse.

ADD REPLYlink written 6.4 years ago by Dan Gaston7.1k
0
gravatar for biorepine
6.4 years ago by
biorepine1.4k
Spain
biorepine1.4k wrote:

Instead of taking a big step try to join as a intern where they do bioinformatics.

ADD COMMENTlink written 6.4 years ago by biorepine1.4k
0
gravatar for k.nirmalraman
6.4 years ago by
k.nirmalraman980
Germany
k.nirmalraman980 wrote:

I would suggest you take a course of data mining or machine learning where your specialization can be using biological data. This gives you a wide scope for developing methods in bioinformatics and also analyzing data. Plus, it does not restrict you to bioinformatics and you can extend to work in various other fields as well, wherever there is large data.

It depends on the course curriculum that is offered as part of your masters. If the program is clearly offered as Bioinformatics, then may be you are limited to studying only courses in data processing (NGS, array, etc....)... If you take a program in Computational Biology, then you would study a wide range of other things!

ADD COMMENTlink written 6.4 years ago by k.nirmalraman980
Please log in to add an answer.

Help
Access

Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy.
Powered by Biostar version 2.3.0
Traffic: 1382 users visited in the last hour