Question: Count Columns For Each Window
0
gravatar for roll
6.6 years ago by
roll330
United Kingdom
roll330 wrote:

I would like to count columns for the matching windows (that is in bed format). I tried awk but too slow.

For example, I have the following two windows

chr1:100-1000
chr1:1500-3000

Fort these 2 windows I found the following matches and would like to count 6th column based on whether the last column is 1 or 0.

chr1 100 1000 chr1 200 0 1 0
chr1 100 1000 chr1 500 0 4 0
chr1 100 1000 chr1 700 0 6 1
chr1 1500 3000 chr1 2000 0 9 1
chr1 1500 3000 chr1 2000 0 1 0

My desired results will be

chr1 100 1000 6/11
chr1 1500 3000 9/10

I tried doing this with awk but since i have millions of entry it is very slow. Is there a bioinformatics tool that do such counts? Or any faster solution?

awk • 2.2k views
ADD COMMENTlink modified 6.6 years ago by dariober11k • written 6.6 years ago by roll330

So let me try to understand this from what I see in your example. Let's say for window of chr 100 1000, you sum up all the numbers in the seventh column that corresponds to this window (hence giving the final value of 11), and then for all those rows, you are looking for the rows that has value of 1 in the final column. Is that right?

ADD REPLYlink written 6.6 years ago by youngcsong100

Also, I assume this is tab-delimited file?

ADD REPLYlink written 6.6 years ago by youngcsong100

yes exactly. My attempt was to have a list of all the windows and use while loop in perl. And awk to count the counts. But it is very slow.

ADD REPLYlink written 6.6 years ago by roll330

Can you have more than one rows with last column value of 1? If so, do you add those values together (so, if the first line in your example had last column value of 1, would this be 7/11?

ADD REPLYlink written 6.6 years ago by youngcsong100

yes you can have more than 1. The example you are giving is correct.

ADD REPLYlink written 6.6 years ago by roll330
3
gravatar for Alex Reynolds
6.6 years ago by
Alex Reynolds31k
Seattle, WA USA
Alex Reynolds31k wrote:

Use awk to split your BED data into two files:

  1. The first file contains all 0/1 overlaps (where the eighth column is either 0 or 1), with the seventh column moved to the fifth (score) column
  2. The second file contains 1-only overlaps (where the eighth column is 1), with the seventh column moved to the fifth (score) column

Let's call these two files allOverlaps.bed and oneOverlaps.bed. Make sure they are sorted per BEDOPS sort-bed:

$ awk '{print $1"\t"$2"\t"$3"\t"$4"\t"$7}' overlaps.bed | sort-bed - > allOverlaps.bed
$ awk '{if ($8==1) {print $1"\t"$2"\t"$3"\t"$4"\t"$7}}' overlaps.bed | sort-bed - > oneOverlaps.bed

Set up a third, tab-delimited, sorted BED file called windows.bed, with your windows of interest:

chr1    100    1000
chr1    1500   3000
...

Here's a one-liner where you apply two BEDOPS bedmap operations in piped, serial fashion:

$ bedmap --echo --sum --delim '\t' windows.bed oneOverlaps.bed | bedmap --echo --sum --delim '/' - allOverlaps.bed > answer.bed

The file answer.bed should follow your specified output format, I think.

To understand how this works, you are applying the --sum operand on the score column of any mapped overlaps (as a result, note that this allows multiple rows with 1 in the last column). By doing this map operation on each category of overlaps, and then by piping results from the first set to the next, we get the final answer.

Should be speedy, I'd think, though awk is tough to beat in straight-up parsing. The sort-bed tool is much faster than alternatives and the bedmap application works very efficiently with BED files (and since your data are already in that format, more or less, why not use the tools to match). We've got some performance enhancements coming soon to make that even faster.

ADD COMMENTlink modified 6.6 years ago • written 6.6 years ago by Alex Reynolds31k
2
gravatar for Michael Dondrup
6.6 years ago by
Bergen, Norway
Michael Dondrup47k wrote:
#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my %store = ();

while (<>) {
  chomp;
  next if /^\s*$/;
  my @l = split;
  my $coord = $l[0].':'.$l[1].':'.$l[2]; ## your chromosome names better don't contain ':'
  $store{$coord} = [0,0] unless (exists $store{$coord});
  $store{$coord}->[0] += $l[6];
  $store{$coord}->[1] += $l[6] if $l[7] == 1;
}

while (my ($k, $v) = each %store) {
  print join "\t", ( (split (':', $k)), $v->[1].'/'.$v->[0]), "\n";
}
__END__

Fast enough?

ADD COMMENTlink modified 6.6 years ago • written 6.6 years ago by Michael Dondrup47k

That sure was fast...I was thinking of a same approach, except I am using python.

ADD REPLYlink written 6.6 years ago by youngcsong100

Fine, post yours, and op can do the speed test ;)

ADD REPLYlink written 6.6 years ago by Michael Dondrup47k

Hmm...16 lines of Perl that only uses while loop vs. 78 lines of python codes containing for loops...I think there already is a winner before the speed test has even begun. You sir, has already put my coding skill to shame :)

ADD REPLYlink written 6.6 years ago by youngcsong100
1
gravatar for dariober
6.6 years ago by
dariober11k
WCIP | Glasgow | UK
dariober11k wrote:

Not sure if I completely understand the question, but I'll give it a shot...

If the starting point is a bed file of target regions already intersected with the "score" regions, like this:

cat b.bed
chr1 100 1000 chr1 200 0 1 0
chr1 100 1000 chr1 500 0 4 0
chr1 100 1000 chr1 700 0 6 1
chr1 1500 3000 chr1 2000 0 9 1
chr1 1500 3000 chr1 2000 0 1 0

Then with awk & bedtools you can do:

awk '{print $0 "\t" $7 * $8}' b.bed \
| groupBy -g 1,2,3 -c 7,9 -ops sum,sum \
| awk 'BEGIN{OFS="\t"} {print $1,$2,$3,$5"/"$4}'

(The second awk is just to have the output formatted exactly as in the OP's example).

If instead the starting point is a bed file of target regions (w.bed) and a bed file of score intervals (a.bed), create the b.bed file above with:

## Example input files
cat w.bed
chr1 100 1000
chr1 1500 3000

cat a.bed 
chr1 199 200 0 1 0
chr1 499 500 0 4 0
chr1 699 700 0 6 1
chr1 1999 2000 0 9 1
chr1 1999 2000 0 1 0

## Create b.bed above:
intersectBed -b a.bed -a w.bed -wa -wb | cut -f1-4,6- > b.bed
ADD COMMENTlink written 6.6 years ago by dariober11k
0
gravatar for youngcsong
6.6 years ago by
youngcsong100
Canada
youngcsong100 wrote:

Well, nonetheless, here's my code...big apologies for stealing someone's thread, but a critic here would help tons...

from optparse import OptionParser
from os import listdir
import os, getpass, sys, string, re

if __name__ == '__main__':
    parser = OptionParser(usage='%prog ...')
    parser.add_option("-t", "--table_file", help="Variation table extracted from VCF file (i.e. 4th and 5th columns of VCF file)")

    (options, args) = parser.parse_args()

    tableFile = options.table_file

    bedHandle = open(tableFile,"rb")

    # This is where our results go in
    compareDict = {}

    totalDenominator = 0
    totalNumerator = 0 

    # Let's process the first line
    bedFirstLine = bedHandle.readline()
    bedFirstLine = string.strip(bedFirstLine)

    bedFirstTab = bedFirstLine.split("\t")

    # This value gets added to denominator and also to the numerator if the switch is equal to one
    firstValue = bedFirstTab[6]
    totalDenominator = firstValue

    firstSwitch = bedFirstTab[7]

    # If the switch is equal to one, we add the corresponding value to the numerator
    if int(firstSwitch) == 1:
        totalNumerator += firstValue

    # Our key to the dictionary consists of the chromosome number, first coordinate and second coordinate of the window, all concatenated by "_"
    compareKey = bedFirstTab[0] + " \t" + bedFirstTab[1] + " \t" + bedFirstTab[2]

    compareDict[compareKey] = (totalNumerator, totalDenominator)

    # We now process the subsequent lines by using the methods similar to the one that we applied to the first line
    for bedNextLines in bedHandle.readlines():
        bedNextLines = string.strip(bedNextLines)
        bedNextTab = bedNextLines.split("\t")
        keyCompare = bedNextTab[0] + " \t" + bedNextTab[1] + " \t" + bedNextTab[2]
        tempValue = bedNextTab[6]
        tempSwitch = bedNextTab[7]

        if compareDict.has_key(keyCompare):
            currEntryList = compareDict[keyCompare]
            currNumerator = int(currEntryList[0])
            currDenominator = int(currEntryList[1])

            currDenominator += int(tempValue)

            if int(tempSwitch) == 1:
                currNumerator += int(tempValue)

            compareDict[keyCompare] = (currNumerator, currDenominator)
        else:
            keyCompare = bedNextTab[0] + " \t" + bedNextTab[1] + " \t" + bedNextTab[2]
            nextValue =  bedNextTab[6]
            totalDenominator = int(nextValue)

            nextSwitch = int(bedNextTab[7])

            if int(nextSwitch) == 1:
                totalNumerator += int(nextValue)


            compareDict[keyCompare] = (totalNumerator, totalDenominator)

  for eachKey in compareDict.keys():
      print eachKey,"\t",compareDict[eachKey][0],"/",compareDict[eachKey][1]
ADD COMMENTlink written 6.6 years ago by youngcsong100
1

The main redundancy seems to come from treating the first line separately duplicating a lot of code. I don't see why this would be necessary. The rest is almost 1:1 equivalent to the perl code (+ a few comments and some assignments options and usage message, in your favor).

ADD REPLYlink modified 6.6 years ago • written 6.6 years ago by Michael Dondrup47k

yup...the redundancy is certainly the point of concern in this code, though I am contemplating how to deal with this. One way would be to take the part that is redundant and make it as separate function, and then replace all the chunks of redundant code with function()...but even then that becomes little tedious (or I am just being lazy, given that it's Friday afternoon at 5 here in Pacific Northwest).

ADD REPLYlink modified 6.6 years ago • written 6.6 years ago by youngcsong100

I think you can simpy treat each line equally. If the dict doesn't contain the key, just add (0,0) for that key: look at these blocks:

This is redundant and can be removed:

totalDenominator = 0
totalNumerator = 0 

# Let's process the first line
[...snip...]
compareDict[compareKey] = (totalNumerator, totalDenominator)

This can be abbreviated:

   if compareDict.has_key(keyCompare):
       [....]
    else:
        keyCompare = bedNextTab[0] + " \t" + bedNextTab[1] + " \t" + bedNextTab[2] # duplicate construction of key!
        [....]
        compareDict[keyCompare] = (totalNumerator, totalDenominator)

And can be replaced by:

  keyCompare = bedNextTab[0] + " \t" + bedNextTab[1] + " \t" + bedNextTab[2]
  if not compareDict.has_key(keyCompare):
        compareDict[keyCompare] = (0,0)
  currEntryList = compareDict[keyCompare]
  currNumerator = int(currEntryList[0])
  currDenominator = int(currEntryList[1])
  currDenominator += int(tempValue)
  if int(tempSwitch) == 1:
            currNumerator += int(tempValue)
  compareDict[keyCompare] = (currNumerator, currDenominator)
ADD REPLYlink modified 6.6 years ago • written 6.6 years ago by Michael Dondrup47k
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