Question: Drawing ChIPseq graphics
3
gravatar for NHEJ
4.8 years ago by
NHEJ320
United States
NHEJ320 wrote:

In a number of ChIPseq papers I have seen graphs that have on the y-axis plotted "peak frequency" and on the x-axis plotted "log 10 (distance to transcription start site)"  

I have also seen common ChIPseq plots showing on the y-axis "reads per million mapped reads" and on the x-axis "Distance to transcription start site."  

However, none of these papers mentioned what software was used to generate said plots, and I was wondering if anybody here might know this information?

It would also be beneficial if anyone had a recommendation as to what kinds of plots they frequently encounter in day to day ChIPseq papers that they consider to be *almost necessary* to include in any ChIPseq paper.

plots chip-seq • 3.3k views
ADD COMMENTlink modified 4.8 years ago by Ming Tang2.5k • written 4.8 years ago by NHEJ320

Can you provide some specific references? Your description mentions simply x,y plots, which can be drawn with virtually every graphing program ever written. Is your question more about graphing programs? Or more about software for pushing around ChIP Seq data?

ADD REPLYlink written 4.8 years ago by seidel6.8k
3
gravatar for Madelaine Gogol
4.8 years ago by
Madelaine Gogol5.1k
Kansas City
Madelaine Gogol5.1k wrote:

R is pretty common, but if you don't know R, you could try ngsplot. It's an R script you call from the command line with various flags and config files. It can create a lot of the average gene type plots.

ADD COMMENTlink written 4.8 years ago by Madelaine Gogol5.1k
3
gravatar for Ryan Dale
4.8 years ago by
Ryan Dale4.8k
Bethesda, MD
Ryan Dale4.8k wrote:

I ran into the same problem a while ago -- I saw a lot of fancy ChIP-seq figures with no information in the methods to describe how they were made.

So I wrote metaseq (paper, github, docs).  At the same time, others wrote ngsplot and deepTools to address the same lack of tools.

ngsplot and deepTools are great for use from the command line; metaseq is more of a toolbox.  Example 1 walks you through making a custom ChIP-seq figure and gives a taste for what you can do with the package.

ADD COMMENTlink written 4.8 years ago by Ryan Dale4.8k
2
gravatar for Ming Tang
4.8 years ago by
Ming Tang2.5k
Houston/MD Anderson Cancer Center
Ming Tang2.5k wrote:

you need to know some basic programming skills.

annotate your peaks first ( how far is the peak from the TSSs), then you count the peak numbers in each different categories(0-5kb, 5-10kb etc) and then plot a bar graph.

easier way, try to use GREAT tools http://bejerano.stanford.edu/great/public/html/

 

 

 

 

ADD COMMENTlink written 4.8 years ago by Ming Tang2.5k
2
gravatar for madk00k
4.8 years ago by
madk00k340
Heidelberg
madk00k340 wrote:

A lot of graphs of this type can be created using CEAS (http://liulab.dfci.harvard.edu/CEAS/)

CEAS is also a part of Cistrome pipeline, which can be accessed from Galaxy web interface (http://cistrome.org/ap/) or from desktop application Unipro UGENE (http://ugene.unipro.ru)

ADD COMMENTlink written 4.8 years ago by madk00k340
1
gravatar for Guangchuang Yu
4.8 years ago by
Guangchuang Yu2.1k
China/Guangzhou/Southern Medical University
Guangchuang Yu2.1k wrote:

ChIPseeker can creates similar figures: http://ygc.name/2014/04/30/visualization-methods-in-chipseeker/

ADD COMMENTlink written 4.8 years ago by Guangchuang Yu2.1k
0
gravatar for Ming Tang
4.8 years ago by
Ming Tang2.5k
Houston/MD Anderson Cancer Center
Ming Tang2.5k wrote:

I prefer Genomation http://al2na.github.io/genomation/

high quality output and very flexible and easy to use! If you know some R.

ADD COMMENTlink written 4.8 years ago by Ming Tang2.5k
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