Question: What is the importance of different isoforms with same CDS regions and same proteins? Why in nature it is needed?
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gravatar for afashmalik
2.7 years ago by
afashmalik0
afashmalik0 wrote:

I was comparing isoforms of a gene and got realised that they all were having the same CDS region though their 5' UTR regions were different but their 3' UTR regions were same. Can someone explain what is the purpose and importance of these isoforms when they have the same CDS and same proteins and also what is the purpose of having different 5'UTRs but same 3' UTR regions (even on transcript does not have 3' UTR). Thank you!

isoforms gene • 1.2k views
ADD COMMENTlink modified 2.7 years ago • written 2.7 years ago by afashmalik0
1

Although the CDS is the same and therefore the translation, different UTRs may contain some elements (CpG islands, Transcription Start Sites) that can have a different impact depend on the time and mode of transcription. Or different polyadenylation sites and signal. Have you got concrete examples? It may help to visualise them in the context of the gene and its other transcripts.

ADD REPLYlink written 2.7 years ago by Denise - Open Targets4.8k

Actually the gene I am working on has the same condition where the all the isoforms of the gene codes for the same enzyme and how this may help to visualise them in the context of the gene and its other transcripts? I could not understand your this point. Can you explain this how?

ADD REPLYlink written 2.7 years ago by afashmalik0

Sorry if my point was confusing. I just wanted to see an example of such transcripts in a nice visualisation tool such as Ensemblenter link description here. Look at ICAM2-010 and ICAM2-012. Their 5'ends are different although the protein starts at the same ATG, it's in the same frame (note that both are partial translation though as it stands). How many isoforms have you got for your gene? Are the available in the public domain? What are they called?

ADD REPLYlink written 2.7 years ago by Denise - Open Targets4.8k

Check out, for example, Wikipedia - 5'UTR role in translational regulation and Barrett et al, 2012.

ADD REPLYlink modified 2.7 years ago • written 2.7 years ago by keith.hughitt250
1
gravatar for WouterDeCoster
2.7 years ago by
Belgium
WouterDeCoster37k wrote:

Probably a regulatory difference, tissue-dependent transcription.

ADD COMMENTlink written 2.7 years ago by WouterDeCoster37k
0
gravatar for afashmalik
2.7 years ago by
afashmalik0
afashmalik0 wrote:

Actually the gene I am working on has the same condition where the all the isoforms of the gene codes for the same enzyme and how this may help to visualise them in the context of the gene and its other transcripts? I could not understand your this point. Can you explain this how?

ADD COMMENTlink written 2.7 years ago by afashmalik0

But the protein may be required in a number of different circumstances. The different 5' UTRs will mean there are different promoter regions, allowing the protein to be expressed in response to different combinations of transcription factors.

ADD REPLYlink written 2.7 years ago by Emily_Ensembl17k

But promoter regions are not present in 5' UTR region or you mean something else?

ADD REPLYlink written 2.7 years ago by afashmalik0

No, they're upstream. But different 5' UTRs mean they have different transcription start sites and different promoters.

ADD REPLYlink written 2.7 years ago by Emily_Ensembl17k
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