Forum: Brainstorming: applying bioinformatics NOT to public field. Ideas and perspectives
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gravatar for lessismore
5 months ago by
lessismore490
Mexico
lessismore490 wrote:

Hey all,

it has already been few years that i am trying to cope everyday with bioinformatic problems and finding solutions for them, sometimes efficient ones, sometimes rude and time-saving ones. I guess you all know how it feels.
Despite it is for sure exciting and full of fun from one side, from the other i hardly feel on myself the stress of doing that for public research.

That's why here i write you for having your opinion on how to adapt any kind of data analysis to a potential private business in terms of consultancy or in terms of simply shifting from public to private field (and NOT forcely private research), the skills needed, what will be worth to improve (or develop) and if there could be related areas (not only biological or biotechnological) where we can apply our skills. Of course there will be many, but i really want to have all possible inputs (meant as a brainstorm) from all of you.

Sincerely love this community and i thank you in advance

ADD COMMENTlink modified 5 months ago • written 5 months ago by lessismore490
1

This post could use a more relevant title. Current title Brainstorming about another kind of life feels like clickbait on a commercial site. You may want switch to a title which indicates that you are looking to diversify from doing just bioinformatics to other types of analytics (if I read the intent right).

ADD REPLYlink modified 5 months ago • written 5 months ago by genomax55k

Thats actually a proper sensational title and makes to me a lot of sense, but i replaced it with a more specific one

ADD REPLYlink modified 5 months ago • written 5 months ago by lessismore490
1

One simple word of advice: create a LinkedIn page and update your CV (curriculum vitae). Also, be careful about claiming to be an expert at something at which you may not [be expert]. Pressures in freelancing and the private sector can be harsh. We're talking about commitments on Friday and Saturday nights (and at short notice).

ADD REPLYlink modified 5 months ago • written 5 months ago by Kevin Blighe28k

Thank you Kevin. You are right. What do you suggest for shifting to private sector (big companies as Jean-Karim suggested) when you have a long accademic history?

ADD REPLYlink written 5 months ago by lessismore490

The answer seems obvious, but, just start to apply for jobs and see what the initial feedback is like. I do encourage a Linkedin page, though. Also, do not use some silly email address for the purposes of contact.

ADD REPLYlink written 5 months ago by Kevin Blighe28k
5
gravatar for Jean-Karim Heriche
5 months ago by
EMBL Heidelberg, Germany
Jean-Karim Heriche16k wrote:

That you're unhappy with your current job is clear but what you're unhappy about is not. I am going to assume that by public you mean academia and that you are asking about non-academic perspectives.

From my point of view, the worse possible job is freelancing in particular when getting started. This is a whole different business. You're on your own for everything and you would need specific skills beyond bioinformatics ones (e.g. accounting, marketing, management ...). You're unlikely to make big money and/or reduce your working hours this way because whenever you're not doing bioinformatics, you'll be chasing your next contract. This is going to be the most stressful unless you have another regular source of income (e.g. a spouse with a regular income that pays the bills).

In industry as in academia, a lot of jobs are short fixed-term contracts that, in some respect, are not too different from hiring a consultant.

The day-to-day job pressures can be the same whether in academia or in industry. It really depends on the environment. However, these days, the only employers that can offer a glimmer of job stability are the big companies. Also they are the most likely to enforce/respect job regulations (e.g. compensation for overtime), at least in Europe.

If you could be more precise about what you're dissatisfied with or are looking for in a job, you'll probably get more precise/detailed answers.

ADD COMMENTlink modified 5 months ago by zx87545.0k • written 5 months ago by Jean-Karim Heriche16k
1

I agree - it is essential to formulate and define the problem. Only then will it be possible to identify/recommend a solution.

In addition, I would also strongly agree with the sentiment that financial success requires a lot more than one specific type of skill or ability. Importantly it requires some luck - being in the right place at the right time, recognizing the opportunity and acting on it. What this means is that it requires time. But then hard work and determination makes one lucky...

ADD REPLYlink written 5 months ago by Istvan Albert ♦♦ 77k

Very well said, Jean-Karim!

ADD REPLYlink written 5 months ago by Kevin Blighe28k

Thank you for the very valuable comment. I appreciate. The problem with this job is the stress coupled with the no-stability of it. I perfectly get that the big companies could be the only solution for this problem.

ADD REPLYlink written 5 months ago by lessismore490
1

big companies could be the only solution for this problem.

Perhaps in Europe but certainly not in North America. You are not likely to escape stress no matter where you are. It is how you handle stress that is more critical.

ADD REPLYlink modified 5 months ago • written 5 months ago by genomax55k
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